Hue’s May Wrap-Up 2017

Happy Memorial Day, Everyone!

Alongside this glorious day, I’m casting May a quick send-off with a book list befitting any proud reader. This month’s list? 5 1/4 books. Lots of feelings ahead. Tread carefully. No. Not really. But, drama has a certain flair.

What I’ve Read

Kindred Spirits Kindred Spirits

White Fur: A Novel Hue’s Reviews: White Fur

Paper Girls, Vol. 1 Hue’s Reviews: Paper Girls, Vol. 1

Wrecked Hue’s Reviews: Wrecked

The Girl Who Fell from the Sky Hue’s Reviews: The Girl Who Fell From the Sky

 Justice for Brick. He deserves his own story.

Allegedly Hue’s Reviews: Allegedly

 tyra banks i was rooting for you we were all rooting for you GIF

Girl Through Glass (Review to Follow)

Nickelodeon nickelodeon sophie pepper cool story bro GIF

DNF’d

Every Last Lie

In Essence

With a book BUYING, not RECEIVING, ban, I’m doing good so far this (early) summer. Pray for me!

What did you read this month?

Crafty

Hue’s Reviews: Paper Girls, Vol. 1

WTF did I just read?

Graphic novels are not my forte. I think I’ll keep that understanding packaged strong. I ventured to Paper Girls, Vol. 1 by Brian K. Vaughn for the nostalgia factor alone. Since the setting’s 1988, I smiled because I was twelve during that year and I wanted to read a graphic novel I believed harked back to a time I longed for again.

Time travel. Omega Man-type creeps. Guns. Girls on bikes. An old dude wearing a Public Enemy shirt. Confusion galore.

While I’m all for girls beating the stereotypical system, I like my stories clear and concise. Vaughn’s artwork impressed me, but the story shoehorned a plot tsunami into a jar and closed the lid beckoning me to spend more money for the next volume.

Give me a little foreplay and a little wine before you go for the wham-bam-thank you ma’am, okay?

Verdict: 2.5 out of 5 (More for the art and nostalgia than anything else)

John’s getting all the shine in this post…

Hue’s Reviews: White Fur

“A stunning star-crossed love story set against the glitz and grit of 1980s New York City” (Courtesy of Goodreads)

Jamey and Elise, two people, divided by class and life, meet in New Haven, CT. He’s a Yale student. She’s a wandering soul. Mix instant attraction and sexual obsession. Bake at 425º. Gorge on sex and drama. Expect no cool-off.

Neon. Michael Jackson. Fifty-thousand bracelets clinging for life on my arm. Good times, right? Throw in Reaganomics, poverty, and drug abuse around the country and nostalgia’s becomes unclean. Jamey and Elise live over their heads. None’s the wiser.

Jamey and Elise, two people, divided by class and life, meet in New Haven, CT. He’s a Yale student. She’s a wandering soul. Mix instant attraction and sexual obsession. Bake at 425º. Gorge on sex and drama. Expect no cool-off.

Neon. Michael Jackson. Fifty-thousand bracelets clinging for life on my arm. Good times, right? Throw in Reaganomics, poverty, and drug abuse around the country and nostalgia’s becomes unclean. Jamey and Elise live over their heads. None’s the wiser.

Jamey and Elise, two people, divided by class and life, meet in New Haven, CT. He’s a Yale student. She’s a wandering soul. Mix instant attraction and sexual obsession. Bake at 425º. Gorge on sex and drama. Expect no cool-off.

Neon. Michael Jackson. Fifty-thousand bracelets clinging for life on my arm. Good times, right? Throw in Reaganomics, poverty, and drug abuse around the country and nostalgia’s becomes unclean. Jamey and Elise live over their heads. None’s the wiser.

Libaire paints New Haven, CT and NYC as an observer of its residents. Via omniscient perspective, her narrator scoops us on the cities’ players. We survey their desires. We judge their mindsets. We nitpick at their habits. She dances on the lurid and putrid smells each scene drenches your skin. Blood. Sex. Vomit. Libaire leaves nothing to the imagination. I love writers appealing to our senses. As I read, I require a full picture to walk with the characters. I smell the funk and desperation. I hear the taxis. I see the lights sparkle as the night arrives. Libaire delivers.

As mentioned before, this couple lives beyond their mental means. They live a game daily. You wish the best, but you expect the worst. They’re barely in their twenties. A fool’s game. They obsess over themselves, while having nothing in common, but sex and danger. She’s barely literate and easily angered. He has one year of a Yale education and desiring acceptance. What else beyond obsession do they possess? Surely, this relationship cannot survive into their thirties. The piper will come for what he or she wants later. (I’m showing my age. I fell for the piper’s pit in my teens; so, I relate)

While I love this story, there’s a bit of a clunk. Libaire provides a delicious character in Elise. She owns her sexuality. She curses. She hustles. She’s a survivor. Cool. Here’s the thing: She would have worked better as a woman of color since Libaire pretty much put markers that, if you didn’t know any better, nuances one. Did she fear criticism, if she made this girl black or Puerto Rican, but substituted a white girl, despite giving her attributes of girls I grew up with in my neighborhood? You give her cornrows, slang, and mannerisms ringing black or Puerto Rican, but you make her white.

Big mark missed, Libaire. Big mark missed. Imagine the avenues journeyed if you pushed further. Elise, as she is, could go to Vidal Sassoon, fix her hair, and shop Macy’s, and the Pygmalion moment begins. She would have a better shot of acceptance, leaving class as the sole disdainful reason. But, if she was black or Puerto Rican, no matter the amount of Pygmalion moments, she would never earn acceptance. Thus, racial and class implications permeate the story.Oh well.

Still, the book entertains, even if a story about pushing boundaries walks a tightrope in characterization. 4/5.

*Thank you, Penguin and First to Reads for this reading opportunity in exchange for an honest review*

May 2017 TBR

With a myriad of choices knocking at my door, I chose five books (more or less) to read.

  • White Fur by Jardine Libaire (ebook/Penguin’s First To Read arc). I wish I had this book in printed form. I’m loving its story. Its fire burns my soul. White Fur
  • Paper Girls Vol. 1 by Brian K. Vaughn (Mine!). After hearing a lot of good noise about this graphic novel, I bought the book. Graphic novels never see the light of day with me. I patronize their film or t.v. adaptation, but never read them. How odd, right? Well, a good reader leaves his or her comfort zone and picks a form or genre untouched. Also, the story’s setting – 1988 – and characters’ age (12) gave me instant nostalgic connection (My age during the same year). I couldn’t resist.  Paper Girls

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May Day, May Day. My Favorite Releases This Month

Instead of listing all the May book and movie releases found on blogs (Kudos to you!), I wish to list those I’m anticipating. Cool?

Books

May 2

May 5

May 9

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