Hue’s Classics: “The Lottery”

“It isn’t fair, it isn’t right,” Mrs. Hutchinson screamed, and then they were upon her.” Only when it’s your turn, huh, Mrs. Hutchinson? A quaint village. Superstition and rocks. Failed crops. Humanity dies. What choice do you make? Do you follow authority or do you stand against the crowd? Chilling to the bone without gratuity,…

Hue’s Reviews: Out of the Easy

Imagine a book set in 1950s’ New Orleans about a prostitute’s daughter without a shred of vulgarity. Push your eyes back into their sockets. It’s possible. I read one. “There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion.” – Sir Francis Bacon New Orleans, a city of midnight gamblers, ramblers, and restless…

Hue’s Reviews: Akata Witch

Akata Witch transports the reader to a magical place where nothing is quite as it seems. Born in New York, but living in Aba, Nigeria, twelve-year old Sunny is understandably a little lost. She is albino and thus, incredibly sensitive to the sun. All Sunny wants to do is be able to play football and…

Hue’s Reviews: One of Us is Lying

The Breakfast Club meets Murder Club meets Nancy Drew and The Hardy Boys. But, what we get is a lumpy bowl of cereal meeting cliche after cliche wrapped in post-John Hughes. If you’re going to evoke the aforementioned, make your work saucy. McManus offered a good setup, we meet five kids preparing to sit in…

Hue’s Reviews: Final Girls

Nancy Thompson. Laurie Strode. Sidney Prescott. All final girls from classic horror films gracing screens around the world with blood and terror. Enter Lisa. Sam. Quincy. Sometimes art imitates life without end credits.

Hue’s Reviews: Conversations with Friends

“A sharply intelligent novel about two college students and the strange, unexpected connection they forge with a married couple.” – Goodreads Let’s be honest… Selfish and self-absorbed young woman discusses her daily escapades with equally selfish and self-absorbed people of various occupation and age and learns absolutely nothing. Sally Rooney’s dialogue’s realistic, albeit a bit strange…